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Archive for June, 2010

Friday’s Friendly Funny

Part three of our first-hand look at Friendly Planet’s Athens and 3-Day Greek Isles Cruise

Picking up from where I left off, recounting my experience on the Athens and 3-Day Greek Isles Cruise

When I left you last, we had arrived at the port of Piraeus where we would board the Aquamarine — the cruise ship that would become our home for the next four nights. For those of you who have never been on a cruise, the boarding experience, called embarkation, is exactly what you would imagine. Wait in a line, drop off your bags, and climb the gangway into the belly of the boat.

But there’s one thing about it you might not expect — you have to hand over your passport for the duration of the trip. Considering that international travelers are told over and over again that their passport is the single most important item they own, and that they must risk life and limb to protect it, putting that precious book in the hands of a very friendly, but completely unfamiliar port agent can be panic inducing.

But rest assured, this is how it’s always done. They will not take off with a few thousand passports for a good laugh. And it will be safely returned before you leave the cruise ship at the end of your stay.

Participating in our life boat drill

In return for your passport, you’re given a plastic ID card. This is your replacement passport. If you are ever asked to produce one while on a shore excursion, you can show them your cruise ID card and they’ll know exactly what it is. The card is also linked to a personal credit or debit card so you don’t have to carry around cash or other cards while you’re on the ship.

Upon boarding the ship, the five of us were greeted by the staff of the Aquamarine and led to our cabins. Quick note about cabins on a cruise ship: They are not designed for the over packer. Do everything in your power to keep pieces of luggage to a minimum if you want to be able to walk to and from the door.

After a lengthy (and hilarious) life boat drill, where many jokes about the Titanic were made, we spent the afternoon acclimating ourselves to the layout of the ship, lounging by the pool, and reading up on Mykonos, the first stop on our trip.

Once a quiet fishing village, this tiny island currently boasts a population of about 11,000 and has become one of the most popular summer tourist destinations in Europe. During the summer season, the population shoots to 55,000, and the beautiful beaches, narrow streets, and about 100 bars and clubs are packed with vacationers.

The winding streets of Mykonos

Before disembarking at Mykonos, our tour guide, Heather gathered us together to tell us a bit more about Mykonos. Her biggest piece of advice? Try not to get lost, it’s very, very easy.

Known as the windiest island in the Aegean, the town of Mykonos was built to break the gusts coming in from the sea. Wind enters the city through a break in the buildings, only to be stopped by a wall of houses where the road splits off in two, or three, or more different directions.

If you click on the image to the right, which I found on The Mykonos Island Reservation and Travel Agency website, you can see how the streets look like a tangled web. According to Heather, the confusing layout had a secondary purpose. It was a way to slow down the pirates who attacked the port from time to time.

While intruders would quickly get lost in the confusing streets, locals would shut themselves into their houses, climb to the top floor, and drop boards connecting balcony to balcony over the narrow pathways. They would run from house to house and hide, unbeknownst to the pirates wandering the maze below.

My first Greek sunset

Before disembarking at Mykonos, I had a minute to catch my first Greek sunset on film, looking over the deck of the ship. Then we were off, down the gangway on onto buses that drove us the mile from where the ship docked into the town.

Heather was right. From pretty much the moment we took our first turn, we were completely disoriented. Had we been there in season, when the streets are jammed with people, I don’t know how we ever would have been able to find our way out. But because it was late March, and the night air was still chilly, Mykonos was ours to explore.

Once we were thoroughly lost in the streets, we explored our way right into a local restaurant for dinner. We sampled delicious moussaka, pita, tzatziki, and chicken gyros.

Our waiter even offered us a round of complementary dessert liquor! We thought we were special, until the table of American guys next to us said they’d been given an entire bottle to share the night before. I guess it was just that famous Greek hospitality, not how cute we looked. 🙂

A narrow street in Mykonos

The experience in Mykonos might have been a bit different had we arrived two weeks later. It’s truly the heart of the European party scene, once the weather turns warm. But no matter what time of year you’re there, the architecture is beautiful, and you really feel like you’ve been transported to another time.

After finishing our dinner and more free drinks from our waiter, it was time to find our way out of the town (easier than we thought it would be) and back to the bus.

One island down, four to go! Check back for my next post and an explanation of how you end up in Turkey when you’re on a trip to Greece.

Friday’s Friendly Funny

The Wall Street Journal features my memorable travel moment in France

Standing Together: A tale of travel and solidarity 

I’m lucky to have traveled a great deal of the world. And I’ve had some of the best experiences of my life on the road. So when The Wall Street Journal asked readers to share their most memorable travel stories, many sprang to mind, but one stood taller than the rest.

I submitted it a couple weeks ago. And then the paper’s editors e-mailed me saying they’d like to publish it as an article. I was so flattered, and of course gave them my permission. The Wall Street Journals’ editors published it on Saturday.

You can read the full story on WSJ’s website. It’s about my trip to Nice, France during 9/11, the emotional days that ensued, and the kindness of the French.

But I was in for another pleasant surprise. I received some touching comments from WSJ readers, and I want to share them with you. Here they are, taken directly from my inbox. Thanks again to the editors for publishing my piece and the readers who wrote in to me.



Dear Ms. Goldman,

I just read your article in the WSJ entitled “Standing Together After 9/11”. We were in the same area of France at the same time. Your experience is exactly the same as mine. It was my first trip to France. I was pleasantly surprised to find the people so kind and caring in Southern France. My friends back home find my “French” story hard to believe. Thank you for verifying the truth of my experience.

Regards,
Joycelyn Schmid




Ms Goldman,

I read with great interest your article in travel section of todays WSJ.
My husband and I along with my sister and brother in-law left Chicago O’Hare on Sept. 10th 2001 for Paris. When we landed nothing had happened yet. We arrived at our hotel much too early to check in, so a nice young woman let us store our bags in a small office.
When we returned later in the afternoon she greeted us with apologies over and over again.
She did not speak English so she just ushered us into the small office with a small tv and we watched in horror the planes flying into the World Trade Center.
After two days in Paris, we rented cars and drove to St. Maximin in the south.
We arrived there on a Sunday and got to the house we rented and then just walked around the little town. There was a concert going on at the church so we went in and sat down.
The organist was going to be using the organ which dated back to the 11th century.
The first piece he played was the Star Spangled Banner. It just sent chills down your spine. Women were coming up to us crying and saying how sorry they were. Obviously they could tell we were Americans.

Whenever I hear now about how the rude the French are I love sharing this story.

thank you.
Nancy Hansen



It’s was so nice to hear Nancy’s and Joycelyn’s travel stories. I would love to hear some of your memorable travel stories. Feel free leave a comment to this post with your story.

Friday’s Friendly Funny

Friday’s Friendly Funny